Fuzzy Ponies!

fuzzy ponies

A question we get asked a lot at DuBois Center is, “What do you do with the horses in the winter?” The answer varies depending on the severity of the weather. Horses possess many adaptations to help them stay comfortable in even the most extreme conditions.

For instance, you might notice that our herd is fuzzier in the winter. Their thicker coats help insulate them from the cold, as well as retaining oil that repels moisture. Internally, their metabolism heats the horses from the inside out. As long as a horse has an adequate supply of hay and grain (which we provide) to fuel this “furnace,” it will not suffer from lower temperatures. Short bouts of physical exertion, such as bucking and running as well as shivering, also help to heat up muscles and stabilize internal temperatures.

During extreme conditions, like during the recent polar vortex, our horses come into the barn daily for an extra feeding. The barn is adapted as a wind shelter and left open on one end, allowing the horses to meander in and out at their leisure. In addition, there is a heated waterer outside the barn, providing the horses (and barn cats) with constant access to fresh water.

So, when the temperatures drop and wind speeds pick up, have no fear – a combination of horse anatomy and proactive care ensure the health of our herd.

Wrangle & Ride – Spring 2019

Horse 2

Join our equestrian team on Saturday, April 13, 2019 from 9 am – 5 pm for a full day of fun with the DuBois Center herd! Designed for both beginner and more experienced riders, this is a horse-intensive day of grooming, tacking, riding, instruction and other horse-related activities. Beginners will be introduced to basic skills, while experienced riders work on more advanced options. The cost for this event is $65 with lunch included. Online registration begins February 1. Questions? Contact DuBois Center at dcinfo@DuBoisCenter.orgor 618-787-2202.

Registration Deadline for Wrangle & Ride

wrangle and ride deadline
There’s still time to sign-up for Wrangle & Ride, a horse-intensive day at DuBois Center! The registration deadline is THIS Saturday, April 7.
Wrangle & Ride is for enthusiasts ages 12 and older. Yes, youth and adults are all welcome! Groom, tack, ride and enjoy other horse-themed activities from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 21. The cost is $60 per person and lunch is included. Activities are geared for novice riders and those with more experience.
Click here for a flyer and reservation form or register online. Contact DuBois Center at dcinfo@DuBoisCenter.org or 618-787-2202 with questions.

Wrangle & Ride – April 21

Wrangle and Ride

Join our equestrian team on Saturday, April 21 from 9 am – 5 pm for a full day of fun with the DuBois Center herd! Designed for both beginner and experienced riders, this is a horse-intensive day of grooming, tacking, riding, instruction and other horse-related activities. Beginners will be introduced to basic skills, while experienced riders work on more advanced options.

The cost for this event is $60 with lunch included. Register by March 31 and save $5. Final deadline is April 7 – if space is still available. Space for this day often fills up fast! Click here for a flyer and reservation form or register online. Questions? Contact DuBois Center at dcinfo@duboiscenter.org or 618-787-2202.

The DuBois Center Herd Grows by One

Lexi one

After traveling hundreds of miles, members of the DuBois Center equestrian team found a horse that seems to be a perfect fit for our program. They are excited to introduce the newest member of the DuBois Center herd – Lexi! She is a seven year-old Haflinger who stands 14 hands tall. She is shorter than many of our horses, but very sturdy, which makes her an ideal ride for a variety of campers and guests.

Volunteers spent the last two weekends working with her in preparation for summer – introducing her to the herd, riding the trails and getting her settled in the Deer Run pasture for a week with her new friends. By all accounts, Lexi is a gentle, easy-going horse who is quick to make new friends. She already seems like “just one of the herd” – which is often not the case initially for new horses.

NOTE: After recent retirements, the equestrian team is still looking for one more “perfect fit” to round out the herd. If you have any recommendations, contact Scott Kuether at sekuether21@gmail.com.

Lexi two